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The Curious Case of Monica Sells and Linda Randall

The Curious Case of Monica Sells and Linda Randall published on 7 Comments on The Curious Case of Monica Sells and Linda Randall

I have mentioned this before in my Why-I-Love-Dresden post. Whenever I recommend the series to anyone, whether they are close family members, people who have friended me on facebook, or people I meet on the street, I always mention one thing: The first two and a half books are not representative of the writing in the rest of the series. Fool Moon is especially hard to get through, but it is so worth it. So, so worth it.

Two problems in Storm Front (which is still a very engaging and fun read) are the arcs of the characters Monica Sells and Linda Randall. There is nothing wrong with them in description or deed. The characters in and of themselves make sense. The problem? They’re cliché.

When Harry is initially brain-storming with Murphy and Carmichael as to who could possibly do this, he is pretty confident that the person involved would be a witch:

“’Yes. The killer knew the victims. And I’m thinking it was a woman.’…’Because you can’t do something that bad without a whole lot of hate,’ I said. ‘Women are better at hating than men. They can focus it better, let it go better. Hell, witches are just plain meaner than wizards. This feels like feminine vengeance of some kind to me.'”

This supposition is later discarded, caught up as Harry is in discovering that Victor Sells very much wants to kill him for getting in his way, for investigating him. The set-up in Storm Front thus remains no different than in a lot of crime fiction: a victim comes to the hero, a mystery is introduced, there is an alternate mystery that turns out to be connected to the first, etc. It’s a formula, and it’s one that works. So why don’t I quite believe that Monica Sells is exactly as she appears to be: a damsel in distress, a total victim of her husband’s quest for power?

For one, Butcher eats clichés for breakfast. The story of how Storm Front came to be is a story oft-repeated:

“ In 1996 he enrolled in a writing class where he was encouraged to write a novel similar to the Anita Blake: Vampire Hunter series by Laurell K. Hamilton, rather than the more traditional high fantasy that had been his focus in the past, as Butcher had previously stated that he enjoyed the Anita Blake series. Despite initial resistance, he wrote the first book that semester, closely following the instructions of his teacher, author Deborah Chester: ‘When I finally got tired of arguing with her and decided to write a novel as if I was some kind of formulaic, genre writing drone, just to prove to her how awful it would be, I wrote the first book of the Dresden Files.’ ”.

After that first chapter was written, he envisioned the entire series (well, the big huge plot points, anyway). Butcher has always maintained – always – that he likes to subvert tropes, and make clichés his bitch.

For another, if one follows the story with a suspicious eye pointed at Monica Sells, it reads like Monica is setting Harry Dresden up to take the fall for her husband. She gets Harry involved in the background to a major SI investigation. She gives him just enough information to get him to suspicious places at suspicious times, she dangles her own distress like a carrot, and chivalrous Harry Dresden is none the wiser.

But what about the soulgaze? Harry saw that she was mama bear protecting her children. If Monica was setting Harry up for a fall, and hoping he’d take out her husband while doing it, that technically counts as protecting her kids from being known children of a warlock, of a legal mess, or undue scrutiny. I think when Harry found innocence, it was nothing more than a mask. My bet is that Monica Sells will show up again, and some of the aspects of Harry’s first case up against the series-wide threat will be made clear.

Linda Randall is another case entirely.

The White Court is introduced—spectacularly so—in Grave Peril. Thomas Raith attends the utterly important masquerade, and though we don’t yet know he and Harry are brothers, his scenes pop from the page. The White Court is an entirely different breed of vampire than the Reds and the Blacks—they feed off strong emotions. They are inhumanly beautiful, physically powerful beings that can also manipulate pretty much anyone they want to into doing pretty much anything they want. I have a theory that the White King was responsible for a lot of the earlier events in the series, like Sells being taught magic, the FBI guys getting the wolf belts, etc. But that is for another essay, now we are focusing specifically on certain oddities in a character from Storm Front: Linda Randall. One of my favorite moments in the series comes from Blood Rites, and in it one of Harry’s favorite enemies is introduced:

“The newcomer was the real thing. She was grace. Beauty. Art. As such, she was not so easily quantified.
She would have been tall, even without the heeled faux-Victorian boots of Italian leather. Her hair was so dark that its highlights were nearly blue, a torrent of glossy curls held partially in check with a pair of milky ivory combs. She had eyes of dark grey with hints of violet twilight at their centers. Her clothes were all effortless style: natural fabrics, black skirt and jacket embroidered with abstract dark crimson roses with a white blouse.
Thinking back later, I couldn’t clearly remember her facial features or her body, beyond a notion that they were superb. Her looks were almost extraneous. They weren’t any more important to her appeal than a glass was to wine. It was at its best when invisible and showing the spirit contained within. Beyond mere physical presence, I could sense the nature of the woman—strength of will, intelligence, blended with a sardonic wit and edged with a lazy, sensuous hunger.”

Lara Raith (married name Lara Romany) is one of Harry’s favorite enemies. In fact, he reveals to Thomas that when he was deciding on how to kill himself, it crossed his mind that he could do worse than allowing Lara to eat him all up. He may not trust her, he may not like her, he may regard her as one of the scariest beings he has ever come across, but he (and we, the readers) can’t deny the attraction he feels whenever he is in her presence. She is beauty, grace, and dangerous sexuality all in one.

Compare this description to Linda Randall, another dark-haired, grey-eyed beauty to whom Dresden was drawn to intensely.

“It buzzed down, and a woman in her mid-twenties arched an eyebrow at me. She had beautiful eyes the color of rain clouds, a little too much eye shadow, and brilliant scarlet lipstick on her cupid’s-bow lips. Her hair was a medium brown, drawn back into a tight braid that made her cheeks look almost sharp, severe, except for her forelocks, which hung down close to her eyes in insolent disarray. She had a predatory look to her, harsh, sharp. She wore a crisp white shirt, grey slacks, and held a lit cigarette in one hand.[…] She was nervous. Nervous enough to be shaking, and now I could see what she was up to. She was wearing the alley-cat mask, appealing to my glands instead of my brain, and trying to distract me with it, trying to keep me from finding something out.”

We’ve got a working theory here at the Wampus that one of the main Big Bads of the series (and, in fact, the cause of Harry’s first few cases) is the White King. We will delve into that next week, but for now we will just say that it’s possible Monica Sells was influenced by the White King in the attempt to neutralize Dresden, and that Linda Randall was a plant from the White Court who met a bad, bad end.

Was Monica Sells totally level with Harry in Storm Front?

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Any chance Linda Randall is either a plant from the White Court, or actually part of the White Court?

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The Duck Quacks Some More

The Duck Quacks Some More published on 3 Comments on The Duck Quacks Some More

Mab, Little Chicago, and Demon Reach, Aka the get out of dead free plan
by Ms DucK

Ok, let’s go back a bit:

Grave Peril:
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Here is where we first meet the winter Sidhe. And here is where it is established that Harry traded Lea his ‘life, fortune, and future’ in exchange for the power to beat Justin. (power he already had, and only needed to believe in himself, but hey.) It is also established that by breaking his word three times, his own power turns against him, his very magic now trying to force him to keep his vow. Harry later bluffs Lea (or so he believes) into an extension, but the debt- life, fortune, and future- remains in force. And then, of course, Mab buys that debt from Lea, in order to balance the scales between them. (This btw means that Harry is worth as much to Mab as the original Morgan lefay’s dagger, or fricking Excalibur) Also in this book we see Harry exit the NN near his apartment, and describe the area of his apt as a shadow version of itself. This is important later, as neither Bob or Harry remember these events in Changes. At some point soon after this book Lea builds her secret entrance into Harry’s lab; she can now enter or leave his place at will (as well as protect the NN side) since Harry’s magic and thresholds are no longer an impediment to her- since she owns them.

Summer Knight:
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Enter Mab. Cue rock and roll music, with extra rocks in. Mab demonstrates that the clause is still in full effect, by making Harry stab himself. They renegotiate; Mab allows Harry a chance to buy himself free, in return for three tasks. The limits are Harry can say No, with no reprisals; the deal remains solely between them; she cannot send lackey’s to chastise or force him by proxy. When Mab leaves, she hurts him, both out of spite and to let the reader know the original clause is still in effect- she still owns his life, future, and fortune; he only has a chance to earn his freedom. At the end she offers him the knighthood, and agrees that all debts between them will be canceled if he accepts.

Proven Guilty:
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Now here is our famous mystery. Who entered Harry’s lab, without his or Bob’s knowledge, and fixed Little Chicago? And why? Who would know about it at all?

Back In 2006 JenniH posted that she didn’t think Mab was responsible for Proven Guilty, as she would not sacrifice a main servitor. Jim replied:

Quote from: jimbutcher on January 13, 2008, 05:11:45 AM

Quote from: JenniH on June 19, 2006, 02:09:18 PM

Mab as orchestrator of all is just a little much for me to swallow. Seems like she loses a lot more than she gains, and I don’t think Mab is big on coming out behind in her negotiations.

Yeah. It sure looks that way from here, don’t it.

But to correct some minor stuff: the fetches aren’t even /close/ to her strongest servitors. They’re her couriers, harassers, spies and occasional assassins. Captain Kudzu was a being that was deemed more-or-less sufficient on the badassometer, but nothing to write home about. The fetches main use, to Mab, isn’t as battlefield thugs. She’s got /plenty/ of other things for that. Another mild correction: who says Mab /lost/ the battle at Arctis Tor, before Harry and Company arrived? At the end of the day, the Winter Queen was still in her fortress–but you didn’t see anyone standing around assaulting the place, did ya. Also, it has probably occurred to more than one of you that if Mab was /really/ in trouble, she could have had the entire military might of Faerie back at the fortress in moments–exactly the way they *did* come back when Harry smacked the Winter Well with the fires of Summer.

(Which goes to show that while Mab may be canny to an inhuman degree, she isn’t infallible. Just way closer to infallible than us.)

See above regarding “the question is *why*?”

Ask yourself why Mab had Molly brought in. What chain of events did that set in motion? What secondary effects came about because of it? Ultimately, Mab can always go to the Wyld and draw in more muscle to replace fallen thugs. If worst comes to worst, with just a few “seed” fae, she could rear up enough Changelings to repopulate her cadre within a human generation or two–nothing, to a being thousands of years old.

As far as she’s concerned, everyone and everything is expendable, including herself, when it comes to adhering to her (seemingly irrational and inexplicable) priorities.

(And by the way–don’t think Titania is much better. When push came to shove, she let her own daughter be murdered rather than upset the balance of the Faerie Courts. At least Mab is up front about it. Usually.)

Sacrifice her best troops? Mab would sacrifice every creature *in* Winter, every one she could bring from Summer, and every single mortal on planet Earth if that’s what she thought was appropriate. And she wouldn’t even need to add extra sugar to her cup of tea afterwards, much less lose sleep over it.

But no one does cold-blooded like the Queen of Winter. Mab’s been in the business a long time, she’s got a balance sheet, and she is *not* going to come out in the red–

–unless, of course, she really *has* stripped a gear, as Lily and Maeve believe. In which case there’s a stark raving bonkers demigoddess whose powers are no longer being held in check by the Escher-esque code of Sidhe behavior. And that’s all kinds of bad.

But hey. It’s probably not that. I mean, not *everything* that happens can be the absolute worst possible possibility, right?

Jim

The part about Mab being mad (with evil smiley face) was later contradicted by Jim when someone else guessed that Mab was not insane, but wounded.Note that this post confirms two things, long suspected: That Mab had Molly brought in, and that Mab and Titania worked together to kill Aurora. And he specifically addressed the chain of events that this caused. Said chain could not have occurred unless Harry and co could reach actris tor, thus for the Plan to work Mab is required to fix it; which she could easily do; just walk thru the bottom door, fix things, and tell Bob to forget it happened.

White Night

Only a small maybe cameo here: The base was built by the Sidhe (think Mab left a hidey hole?)( confirmed in TC, how Did Titania get Morgan out?) and Anastasia complains of headaches, sex drives, and a strange female voice whispering to her in her dreams.

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Stay tuned next week for more from Ms. Duck.

Lieutenant Karrin Murphy, Antagonist

Lieutenant Karrin Murphy, Antagonist published on 8 Comments on Lieutenant Karrin Murphy, Antagonist

fallen murphy

Part I (of MANY)

Judging by the various threads, comments, and pot-stirring in the Jim Butcher Appreciation Society, the topic of Karrin Murphy is a polarizing one. Some express mild shock and genuine bafflement when it’s suggested that Murphy is not the paragon she appears to be from Summer Knight to Changes. But a reread of Storm Front and Fool Moon reminds us that while she’s never been the boss fight, she was an antagonist more surely than Donald Morgan. Hear me out. An antagonist is someone who “actively opposes or is hostile to someone or something”. In this case, Murphy actively opposes and is hostile to Harry Dresden. An old, old interview with Jim Butcher that was published back when Death Masks just came out and Furies of Calderon was still Shepherdboy’s Fury, reveals his motivation in creating the characters of John Marcone and Karrin Murphy:

“I needed someone to provide both threat and distraction for Harry in Storm Front, for example, and got two characters who could do those jobs. John Marcone got to show up as the negative criminal element of the story, the human face of lawlessness and crime. Karrin Murphy is his opposite in number, representative of the law, society, and order. Neither one of them seems to do much for Harry that doesn’t make his day worse and worse, nine times out of ten, but no one’s perfect.”

Murphy is hostile to Harry from the beginning. While Dresden is a police consultant that Murphy has worked with time and again, she treats him more like a confidential informant: he is expected to drop everything and serve her: ““Dresden, I’ve sort of got a pair of corpses with no leads and no suspects, and a killer walking around loose. Your appointment can wait.” Murphy shows no real professional courtesy toward Dresden. She treats him like a confidential informant—someone who is useful to her, someone she can dominate, and someone who is just like every other criminal she comes across, except that she’s using him to gain access to other criminals.

This behavior does not change in Fool Moon.

Murphy forgets halfway through the books that she’s hired Dresden to seek information on her cases, and then suspects him of being the perpetrator. While this is more spectacularly done in Fool Moon, the pattern is also evident in Storm Front. Murphy orders Dresden to the scene of the crime, orders him to figure out how two people were murdered by magic (ignoring the fact Dresden told her he couldn’t), then—when he reveals he’s been doing exactly as she told him to, but with methods she disapproves of—she threatens to arrest him. Then, when Dresden’s fighting for his life and hers against a scorpion that came to life because Murphy wouldn’t listen, she shackles him to her. This reveals the prideful, arrogant, and often stupidly focused mentality of the main cop character in the Dresden Files. Dresden was owed an apology at the end of Storm Front, but Murphy conveniently forgot what a stubborn fool she was attempting to arrest him while they were under attack by a magically constructed scorpion.

Fool Moon is even worse. She shows up at the beginning just in time to pick up a scrap of paper she would later use to incriminate Harry Dresden in the death of his first “apprentice” (though Kim Delaney was not nearly as strong as Molly Carpenter has proven to be, nor was it an official apprenticeship; Harry was more of a mentor). There had been a death, and it was not until they were driving to it that it is revealed to be outside of her jurisdiction. The FBI shows up to intimidate and threaten, and after Agent Benn has taken out her gun and fired at Murphy, Murphy goes along with the lie that it had been an accident. Murphy upholds the law as long as a fellow law enforcement official is not the one breaking it.

Her greetings to Harry are, in general, angry and impatient: “About time, Dresden. Get up here.”

Murphy manipulates Harry into helping her: “After that, it’ll be simple for them to get some charges going on me for complicity or obstruction. And they’ll probably try to get to you, too. Harry, we’ve got to catch the killer, or killers. Or I’m history.” There is no logical reason for Dresden to be indicted for the events of Storm Front, nor would an investigation turn up incriminating evidence against a licensed investigator doing his job. Both times, Murphy dragged Harry into the case; both times she bullied and harassed him into the job—usually by threatening arrest—and both times she built a case against him (including a paperwork trail) at the same time he was helping her.

Murphy does not see a happy ending for a romance between them. Several times in the series, Murphy threatens Dresden that a romance would not end well for him. The first of these occasions happens in Storm Front, and sets the tone of their friendship.

And here we venture forth into speculation. Chapter Two of Storm Front introduces the reader to Murphy (in the flesh, as it were). They meet outside the Madison and head together to the grisly crime scene, and Dresden has a niggling doubt about her: “My shadow and Murphy’s fell on the floor, and almost looked as though they were sprawled there. There was something about it that bothered me, a nagging little instinct that I blew off as a case of nerves.” Butcher has used shadows for very interesting things later on in the series – for one, Nicodemus Archleone can listen in on almost any conversation he wants to by using his Denarian, Anduriel (whose name, coincidentally, I’m sure, means “shadow of Uriel”). Later on in Storm Front, Dresden mentions that the mark He Who Walks Behind has on him “could still be seen upon me by those who knew how, by using the Third Sight, stretching out behind me like a long and horribly shaped shadow.” Whatever it is that caused that moment of doubt has not been made clear. Yet.

There is also the fact that some of Murphy’s backstory contradicts itself. In “Restoration of Faith”, set no more than four years prior to the events of Storm Front, Murphy is a young beat cop. In Storm Front, she is a lieutenant and department head “who had to fight and claw and play dirty with the hairiest men in Chicago to get as far as she has.” Making lieutenant and becoming a department head in less than three years is not only highly unlikely given the amount of time one has to stay at one rank before one can test for a higher rank, but is a meteoric rise that could hardly have been hampered by institutionalized sexism. There are several possibilities for this: 1) Butcher neglected his research in this one area, 2) Murphy is a plant from someone who can pull strings (like government spooks) at a city level, 3) Murphy isn’t human, and can enforce her will and remake her little corner of reality, etc.

In closing, at the 2011 Boston signing, Butcher mentioned this: “I know that a lot of the folks that are generally perceived as bad guys aren’t necessarily, there are several who are currently perceived as good guys who aren’t necessarily, and we’ll continue to have those fall out over the next several books.” Lieutenant Karrin Murphy is the prime candidate for the betrayal that will hurt Harry all the way to his core. I’ve got an idea of who will eventually unmask her and why, but that will have to wait for another day.

Do you think it's possible that Murphy will turn out to have been Harry's adversary all along?

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The talented Andrea Gonzales is responsible for the lovely photograph. She can be found at various spots on the web, including here.

The views expressed in this post don’t necessarily reflect the views of the people in the photograph, but they did give their permission.

[Review and Giveaway] The Cave by Michela Montgomery

[Review and Giveaway] The Cave by Michela Montgomery published on 4 Comments on [Review and Giveaway] The Cave by Michela Montgomery

24964266

About the Book

The Cave by Michela Montgomery
(The Wind Cave #1)
Published by: Post Hill Press
Publication date: April 7th 2015
Genres: New Adult, Post-Apocalyptic

When a nuclear war devastates the U.S., a four-day excursion quickly turns into a fight for survival in The Cave. Six Stanford students journey into one of the deepest and longest caves in North America. A day into their journey, a nuclear war begins from within the U.S. Unable to return to the surface, and unsure what they will find when they do, the Cave will test the strength and survival of each person differently – transforming six individuals into a team, and ultimately…a family.

Review

The Cave is a stellar representative of a fairly new genre.

A peculiar phenomenon happens every once in a while in the publishing world. An innovative idea becomes a trend, which becomes something agents and editors actively hunt down, which is given a (usually cute) nickname by critics and reviewers, and finally becomes a titled and recognizable subgenre (or genre) with a healthy and growing list of works nestled safe beneath its umbrella.

The Cave is part of the New Adult genre, and the name should be self-explanatory. The characters tend to be four or five years older than characters in Young Adult series, and they have adult situations: characters have sex in pitch-black caves, get injured, swear, and face situations that aren’t necessarily as glossy as those that occur in YA. But the characters are still young. They are allowed to make mistakes, are allowed to be sexually inexperienced, to make awkward comments, to accidentally lead their friends astray. There’s a reality to the dialogue and awkwardness that reminded me of who I was in my early twenties.

The Cave is genuinely frightening.

The author does not waste words. The book is immediately claustrophobic. As the main characters travel through the titular cave, they (and we) continue to make assumptions about what is going on in the outside world. Very brief scenes that were not written from the POV of the college-age spelunkers offer little flickers of what is going on, and it is not pretty. I can’t wait to see where it goes in the following installments.

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Dead Beat Giveaway!

Dead Beat Giveaway! published on 3 Comments on Dead Beat Giveaway!

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Welcome to the first giveaway on the Butcher Block!

We’re giving away five copies of Dead Beat to five different people. Dead Beat is, in many ways, the book that blew the series up in a major way: it’s the first to deal with necromancers, it’s the first to show Harry’s dad on screen, it’s the first that was published in hardcover. In many ways, this book can be used as an entry point to the series (although we are completionists, and do advise reading the first six). Our copies of Dead Beat are battered and loved and held together with duct tape — we figure we’re not the only ones who have read the book to death.

We’ve included several different ways you can win a copy. Of course, the more points you score, the greater your chance of winning. Good luck!

The World as Harry Knows It

The World as Harry Knows It published on 4 Comments on The World as Harry Knows It

The World As Harry Knows It
Storm Front, Fool Moon, Grave Peril

As with anything, Urban Fantasy is interpreted in many different ways by many different authors. Some authors have cloaked the fantastical world in secrecy, and it is hugely difficult for the characters to find out anything. Other authors (like Kim Harrison) have humans and immortals living side-by-side, working together, and even procreating. Butcher chose to place the Dresden Files somewhere in between, as is elucidated in the following quote:

“Science, the largest religion of the twentieth century, had become somewhat tarnished by images of exploding space shuttles, crack babies, and a generation of complacent Americans who had allowed the television to raise their children. People were looking for something—I think they just didn’t know what. And even though they were once again starting to open their eyes to the world of magic and the arcane that had been with them all the while, they still thought I must be some kind of joke.”

The government is not wholly unaware of magical doings, as is evidenced by the existence of Special Investigations. Karrin Murphy heads the Department that handles any cases that seem particularly unusual, like vampire attacks, troll marauderings, and faerie abductions. Harry has worked with SI before, though he is their consultant on a murder case for the very first time in Storm Front. Moreover, even in the first three books, before Harry has truly begun his career as Chicago’s avenger, we have evidence that someone is working behind the scenes to create dangerous enemies out of mediocre people. In Fool Moon, we have the FBI infiltrated by four agents who have had enough contact with the magical world that they have belts that turn them into wolves—the better to hunt down their prey. This betrays the fact that someone in the know, and powerful enough in their own right, has infiltrated the upper echelons of government and is pulling strings.

The fringe of society, occupied by the misfits, has its own belief and suspicion of such things. The local equivalent of the Weekly World News, the Chicago Arcane, covers “all sorts of supernatural and paranormal events throughout the Midwest.” Harry thinks of the yellow magazine with plenty of derision, though he does acknowledge it gets some of stuff right. “But once in a great, great while, the Arcane covered something that was real. Like the Unseelie Incursion of 1994, when the entire city of Milwaukee had simply vanished for two hours. Gone. Government satellite photos showed the river valley covered with trees and empty of life or human habitation. All communications ceased. Then, a few hours later, there it was, back again, and no one in the city itself the wiser.” In Storm Front, the magazine is popular enough that little Jenny Sells—daughter of the prime antagonist—recognizes Dresden’s face from it. In Fool Moon, the Chicago Arcane has had an image update, and is now known as the Midwestern Arcane. By the end of Fool Moon, the Arcane’s star reporter, Susan Rodriguez, has a syndicated column with global news outlets.

The Larry King show (alternately known as the Larry Fowler show) is also a way in which those with belief in the supernatural disseminate information. It is only briefly mentioned in the first three books.

Other organizations unaffiliated with the government have at least a small inkling of what creatures lurk in the shadows. It is widely assumed that John Marcone discovered the hidden world of magic and terrible curses through the course of Storm Front—this is simply untrue, after a closer look. We first meet John Marcone in a limousine after Dresden has visited the crime scene. Not only does Marcone have at least a semblance of belief in magic, he deliberately initiated a soulgaze with Dresden in order to take his measure: “That was his purpose in getting me alone. He wanted to take a peek at my soul. He wanted to see what sort of man I was.” Prior to the events of Storm Front, Marcone has spoken to people—people who can distinguish true magic from bragging. One of the enduring mysteries of the series is John Marcone’s past, and it’s hinted at from the moment we meet him.

There is also the other side of the equation to consider. The White Council, first mentioned in chapter two, is Dresden’s governing authority. Most of the Laws of Magic that the Council enforces are directed at how wizards employ magic against them. Outwardly, this looks very altruistic, but by not drawing attention to themselves and magic, the Council Laws help to prevent mortals from declaring war on a threat they don’t understand. So despite all these various factions and departments that are in the know—or at least know a little, it remains to be seen what methods the Council uses to suppress the knowledge of the supernatural world from everyone everywhere.

Storm Front, Fool Moon, and Grave Peril show a slow progression of magic being revealed to the masses, despite the interference of the White Council and other parties. The loup-garou in the police station, the not-quite-humanoid corpses left over from the Velvet Room (which Waldo Butters later reveals to be his induction into the secret world), the video tape of Murphy firing inherited-silver bullets at the loup-garou, and a myriad other examples. Jim Butcher initially wrote about a society that is starting to believe, but still in denial. As the series progresses, mortal authorities and civilians alike are gaining more and more knowledge. It’s exciting to watch this unfold, and I am excited to revisit this topic once the focus has widened.

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